Detroit in 1851…

Sometimes it’s a good thing to take a peek back at the footprints leading up to where we are now and then ask yourself a few questions. I’ll leave the questions up to you.

As for those who are wondering what Windsor, Ontario is doing included in a history of Detroit, well, that is a good question. However, those who have lived in Detroit long enough and know something about it’s history are well aware of the connection. We can start with the Underground Railroad…

Anyway, check it out. And I think I’ll be doing this more often in the future. Because history is a good thing to know, especially when the present and future look cloudy.

Detroit in 1701 -- PHOTO COURTESY OF CLARKE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Detroit in 1701 -- PHOTO COURTESY OF CLARKE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

1851

January – Henry Bibb begins publication of Voice of the Fugitive, an abolitionist newspaper from the town of Sandwich in what is now southwestern Windsor, Ontario.

May 4 A grand jury acquits the clerk of a Detroit court of obstruction of justice charges, despite overwhelming evidence that in January, he tipped-off refugees from slavery that a Tennessee enslaver had just applied for a warrant for their arrest.

May – In a two-day period, 800 to 1,000 refugees from slavery pass through Michigan on the Michigan Central Railroad, to Detroit and on to Windsor after the Harris family, refugees living in Chicago, are returned to slavery in Missouri.

St. Matthew’s Protestant Episcopal Mission, a predominantly African-American church, dedicates a chapel at St. Antoine and Congress.

**Above information provided courtesy of the Detroit African American History Project.

SHAMELESS PLUG: Read my wife’s blog @ http://thedspotredeux.blogspot.com

Advertisements

~ by Keith A. Owens on August 14, 2008.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: